The final marathon to Kirk Yetholm – Day 15

Ok, not quite a marathon but I knew this day was going to be tough and so I was mentally prepared for the long walk ahead. 26 miles of bog trotting over moorland, it was going to take all of my willpower to keep going.

Bryness to Kirk Yetholm (25.75 miles/ 41.2 km)

I set out from Bryness campsite at 6.30am in order to make sure I had plenty of time to do the final leg of the walk and to be able to sit and have lunch (a thing I rarely do) and rest when I needed to (also not common).

From Bryness the Pennine Way heads straight up through the woodland to access the moorland. This is the last view of trees or civilisation I would have for hours as I headed our over the Otterburn Ranges. Much of this area is used as military training ground and so signs keep you from straying from the footpath.

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Heading across the moors I couldn’t yet see the distance or terrain I would be crossing, or even the Roman camp at Chew Green which I was heading for first.

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This cairn marks the only archaeological feature I saw on the whole walk across Chew Green. But after bog trotting and already having damp feet when I saw the sign marking an alternative route to Windy Gyle which was half a mile shorter I took it. So I only looked down on the roman camp (only identifiable from the route by markings in the grass). Having not gone to the small car park I have no idea if there was something worth seeing there. From where I was, it didn’t seem worth the extra half mile to find out.  DSCF6265 DSCF6268

So I trudged on.

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Eventually the route comes to the old Roman Road of Dere Street which linked York and Perthshire and where this section is a scheduled ancient monument. Here the Pennine way skirts around the route to the right of the fence line.

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It wasn’t even mid morning and I was starving so when I reached Yearning Saddle Lamb Hill Mountain refuge I was very happy to have a short break and scoff and entire malt loaf. 10am. I couldn’t even use the excuse it was elevenses. I don’t think I would have wanted to plan to stay at the hut but it was perfectly clean and tidy (I’m comparing to Glen’s Hut a few days earlier, but it was pretty spotless for a hut) and would be perfect if the weather was horrendous or you found yourself benighted.

DSCF6283 DSCF6284Whilst I think paving on peat moorland is a necessary evil to prevent erosion, I don’t enjoy walking on it as it given the knees and feet a bit more of a beating. But after bogs so far I was actually happy to see paving across to Windy Gyle.

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I reached Russell’s Cairn Trig point on Windy Gyle just before 12, a perfect time for a break and a breather. Distance wise I wasn’t even half way yet, which was a challenge mentally rather than physically. Supposedly the site of Lord Francis Russell’s mysterious death in 1585 the cairn is actually thought to be bronze age. At this point in the walk the history washed over me and I was more interested in the chocolate I was scoffing.

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Not long after here I could see my first sight of Cheviot, the huge flat hill did not inspire me and having read the commentary in my 1974 Constable guide to the Pennine way, where Cheviot is described as miles of peat hags and lacking a significant view I had already made my mind up that if it was still like that I wasn’t bothering to make the 2 km addition just to visit the trig point.

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Thankfully the route must have been so bad even across to King’s Seat cairn that much of the Way has recently been paved, which is fantastic, even if my knees where beginning to grumble.

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However I reached the point at where the path splits for the diversion to Cheviot Cairn and the terrain across didn’t fill me with enthusiasm. I decided for the first time in my life that a trig point wasn’t worth the effort, and instead headed through the gate. Even though it means one day I will have to return to ‘bag’ it I still don’t regret it; at that point in the day I would have cursed all the way and been miserable. I was more interested in getting to the next Mountain hut and having a late lunch. (I’ve later read that it is indeed paved now, but still I was too tired to bother at that particular time.)DSCF6303 DSCF6301

So I headed through the gate and off to Auchope cairn where I stopped for a quick snack.

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It was 2pm when I arrived at The Schil mountain refuge and whilst my cheese and onion pasty was well and truly squashed it was the best thing I’d ever eaten.

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The Schil hut sits at the col before you ascend to The Schil summit and as such has a great view across to Cheviot’s better side, of Hen Hole where alpine vegetation remains. The sun had finally made an appearance and so had my smile, (perfect combination of sunshine and cheese!) I also formed the opinion around this point in the day that it was a shame that the huts weren’t like those I’ve been to in the Alps, as I could have murdered a coffee or a strong hot chocolate. But I imagine I was one of only a handful of people (if that) who were likely to walk past here today and its also nice to have the total quiet that emptiness brings.

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From there the route continues over The Schil summit and the splits providing a high a low alternative into Kirk Yetholm. I chose the low route (again not something I would usually do).

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The route has been diverted around Burnhead farm compared to my rather old OS map, but once there I reached tarmac and a long slog down into Kirk Yetholm on the road.

Farm’s often have unsually things lying around, but I think only in Scotland would you find a Tunnock’s container!

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Kirk Yetholm was a great relief when I arrived there 10 hours and 15 minutes after setting off and celebrated with a free pint in the pub (available to all completers!)

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5 thoughts on “The final marathon to Kirk Yetholm – Day 15

  1. Pingback: Tour du Mont Blanc 2012 – Chamonix to Champex | Tinkerbell's adventures

  2. Pingback: Finding my project | Tinkerbell adventures

  3. Pingback: Finding my project | Tinkerbell adventures

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